Terms of Use l Privacy Policy
© 2013 All rights reserved.
  Susan Clarke Haskell. Life member, HASKELL FAMILY ASSOCIATION.
Haskell   Cairns   Clarke   Eather   Willis   World   About   Articles   Bios   Blog   Contact   Crest   Mailbag   News   Obits   Records
The theories....

Housecarl Theory

Housecarls existed as household troops, personal warriors and equivalent to a bodyguard  to Scandinavian lords and kings. The
anglicized term is claimed to begin at the Old Norse term huskarl or huscarl (literally, 'house man', i.e., armed man (churl  in the
service of a specific house.)  Also called hirth ('household') that referred to household troops. The term came to cover armed soldiers
of the household. Often the only professional  soldiers in the kingdom, the rest of the army  being made up of militia  called the fyrd
and occasionally mercenaries. Huscarls are recorded as proficient in a variety of weapons, including the one-handed sword and the
throwing axe. Particularly renown for their unique use of the long-bearded axe.
Records do not mention archers in Huscarl ranks. They fought on foot and rode to battle. Later Hascoll soldiers are listed as archers
and/or Billmen. A Bill was a long handled blade.
The term entered the English language when Canute the Great (Cnut) conquered and occupied Anglo-Saxon England. Cnut re-
organised his army in 1018 and proclaimed that only those 'who its own rules of justice and discipline, answerable directly to the King
(or later some of the more powerful Earls retained Huscarls). Most of the Huscarls lived at court and served him directly. By the time
of Edward the Confessor some Huscarls had been given estates by the king.

The royal entourage had then moved on to Shaftesbury, another pilgrimage site, and a large one, too.  It was here that St Edward
the Martyr, Aethelred’s murdered brother, lay buried.  And it was here that Cnut died on 12 November 1035. He was about thirty-
eight years old.’

O’Brien, Harriet; Queen Emma and the Vikings - Bloomsbury, London; 2005-ISBN - 0747574898              

Housecarl re-enactment
Hook Farm formerly known as Hook Manor
                      
Hucca Theory

Haskells may be of Saxon origin, free-holders of property, but closely attached to Shaftesbury
Abbey. Small farmers in control of their own income. Perhaps Hockel, Huckul are an early form.
Many surnames began in relation to a site.

Le Hok (now Hook Farm) is in Semley parish, Wiltshire near Shaftesbury. Le Hok was listed in early
court records: "....for stealing the abbess of Wilton's corn in sheaf at la Hok". Whitsun 33 Edward I
(31 May 1305).

Robert Hascolle around 1598 held a lease by inheritance from his father Thomas Hascolle on Hook
Farm, a large asset formerly attached to the Wardour Estate in the Donheads.

Hook farmhouse was built in the 17th century and is associated with Hook Manor, to the east of it.
Hook Manor was built in 1636-7 by the Arundell family of nearby Wardour Castle. It passed by
marriage to Sir Cecil Calvert, 2nd Lord Baltimore, who married Anne, the daughter of the Earl of
Arundell around 1625. It is also known as Baltimore House from this owner, who founded the city of
Baltimore from colonists on the ships, 'Ark' and 'Dove' that went to Maryland in 1633. It is a small
limestone manor house, built of local Tisbury stone, and I imagine that the farmhouse is of similar
stone. The farm would have been worked as the manor farm and in the 20th century the manor
house became known locally as Hook Farm. The name 'Hook' comes from a projection of land,
shaped like a hook, and is first mentioned in 1541.

The Saxon chiefs of King Arthur had sons and  followers named after them.  Hoc, Hocca, or Hucca
was one of these chiefs. Huckel, Huckell and Huckle would apply to a son. Was a Saxon Chief rather
than a Scandinavian Housecarle our ancestor?
Evidence suggests a continuous presence  in the Dorset-Wiltshire border country since 1327
onwards of Hoskel, Huckul, Huscol, Huscole, Hoskale, Hascole, Hascoll and Haskell surnames.
Several other records indicate that the progression of the spelling to Haskell was almost
standardised by the mid 18th century. Haskoll and Hascall are the two most frequent current
variants.<

Welsh Theory

First found in Monmouthshire (Welsh: Sir Fynwy), anciently the Kingdom of Gwent, a much disputed border region of Southeast
Wales, and English county since 1536 until 1974, where the family was seated in very ancient times, some say well before the
Norman Conquest and the arrival of Duke William at Hastings.
(Origin Welsh) Derivation: hasg, a place of rushes, or sedgy place, and hall or hayle, a moor. Asgall, in the Gaelic, signifies a
sheltered place, a retreat... the addition of the aspirate 'H,' might make the name.
An Etymological Dictionary of Family and Christian Names With an Essay on their Derivation and Import; Arthur, William, M.A.; New York, NY: Sheldon,
Blake, Bleeker & CO., 1857.

Norse Theory

Claims its origins in the settlement of northern and eastern counties of England by Scandinavian people, mostly during the 8th
Century. The modern surname Haskell can also be found as Ashkettle, Askel, Axtell, and Astell, among other forms, is attributed
to the personal name 'Asketill', which is composed of the elements 'oss' or 'ass', meaning 'god' and 'ketill', meaning a kettle or
sacrificial cauldron, the latter being a common element. 'Arkle' or 'Arkell' are attributed to 'Arnkell', 'arn' being 'eagle', added to
'ketill' as above. The most common theory of the origin of this family is that this was the 'Askell' family  using the name Askill and
Achetell before and after the arrival of the Normans. However, the latter variations like "Hauscall and "Hurscarl" smack of Norse
origins like "Hauskarl".

Norman Theory

The surname of HASKELL was a baptismal name meaning 'the son of Anskettle'. The name was brought into England in the wake of
the Invasion by William the Conqueror. The earliest of the name on record appears to be ASKELL. He was listed as a tenant in the
Domesday Book of 1086, ordered by William the Conqueror. The Norman Conquest  changed personal nomenclature. The old English
name system was gradually broken up and often superceded by new continental ones. Most of the early documents recount the
history of the upper classes who realised that an additional name added prestige and practical advantage.  The name of a peasant
rarely appeared. The Domesday Book contains details of his land settlements, and the name of the owners of such. Robert ASKETIL
of County Somerset was documented during the reign of Edward III (1327-1377). Simon ASKETEL, was the rector of Boyton, County
Norfolk in the year 1361, and Roger ASKETIL was the rector of Randworth, Norfolk in 1391.
VARIANTS
Aaskill
Asay
Ascall
Ascell
Ascull
Askell
Askill
Asketill
Askotte
de Hockell
Hacell
Hachekol
Hachyll
Hackyll
Harschell
Harshal
Harshall
Harshil
Harshill
Harskal
Harskall
Harskel
Harskell
Hascal
Hascall
Haschal
Haschall
Hascol
Hascole
Hascoll
Hascolle
Hascom
Hascull
Hasehal
Hasghall
Hasgill
Hashal
Hashel
McHaskell
Oskytel
TenHaskel
Haskal
Haskall
Haskalls
Haskel
Haskele
Haskell
Haskett
Haskiel
Haskil
Haskill
Haskle
Haskol
Haskoll
Haskott
Haskul
Haskull
Heiskel
Heiskell
Heiskill
Herschal
Herschil
Herskell
Hoc
Hocca
Hockel
Hoskale
Hoskall
Hoskel
Hucca
Huckel
Huckell
Houckehill
Huckenhull
Huckle
Huckul
Huckyll
Hurscarl(e)
Huscol
Huscole
Huscarle
Hauscall

The Jewish origin:  the Jewish (Ashkenazic): from the personal name Khaskl, a Yiddish form of the Hebrew name Yechezkel or Ezekiel) which developed into a surname usually spelled Haskel.

The Dutch surname, Heiskell was simplified by some to Haskell.
William the Conqueror 1066
What we know...

1.1086 Domesday Book, Somerset : "Huscarle ten una v. trae qua ipsement teneb. T.R.E. In Estrope. Ibi. Ht. Dimid:car.
Valet XL. Denar." Translated it means that Huscarle held 1 virgate land (about sixty acres) at Eastrip , half a plough, worth
forty pence. Eastrip was near Bruton. In 1329, Ralph Hurscarl, was at nearby Cherlton Mucegros (Charlton Musgrove) for
an inquisition into the taxes on Bruton Priory.

2. Onwards, the records show numerous entries of the surname and its variants concentrated on a small radius of about ten
miles around Shaston, now Shaftesbury in Dorset, England. This area touched on Bruton, Charlton Musgrove, the Donheads
in Wiltshire and south to Fontmell Magna and Melbury.

3. Written spellings  depended on spoken sounds. In early records the spelling often varied for the same person, siblings,
parents, etc.  Misinterpretations of old handwriting styles led to substitution of letters in transcriptions and indexes. Claims
that particular pronunciations and spellings  exclude/include certain family lines is extremely courageous and prone to
error. More validity may be claimed where an 'alias' is included for the same individual in early records. Aliases
demonstrated the gradual spelling progression of Hurscarl, Huckylll and Huckehull to Huscarl, Hascoll(e), Haskoll, etc. Thus
we do know 'c' was often sounded 's' as in 'city'. Refer list of variants in far column.
Where and how did we come by the surname, Haskell? Many theories abound as to the English origin of
our Haskell surname but due to the loss and deterioration of many ancient documents, we may never know for
sure. The thrill of the hunt for that elusive detail to back up our pet theory is the fun part of genealogy!

Is the English origin from Hucca or Housecarle? Is the Haskell surname of Anglo, Saxon, Norman, Norse or
even Welsh origin?  How do the Hurscarls of Bruton in Somerset, England fit in?  Were those named Hucca
originally found at Le Hoc which is now called Hook Farm near Wardour Castle in Wiltshire, England? Or did the
name originate with the king's bodyguards, the Housecarles? Confused? Read on....
Like us on Facebook
Email us
Join Haskells Google Group

HASKELL NAME THEORIES

Google +
Haskell Family Crest
HOME> More> Articles> Here>